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Pain pump dosage increase time

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135

Comments

  • memerainboltmemerainbolt IndianaPosts: 3,432

    Laura
    welcome to Spine-Health and this conversation!!
    My surgeon told me he only uses morphine or dilaudid, but each doctor is different. I have heard of Prialt being used but it has some pretty bad side effects. It is mostly used in Europe.
    I too was genetically tested and the same as you, extremely high metabolism. Right now I'm at 2.707 mg. morphine and 1.477 in the bolus shot, every 4 hrs.

    I hope we can all take each other's advice, ideas and suggestions and help one another out. That's the whole purpose of this.
    Thanks to all of you, I have put questions together for the neurosurgeon.

    Sandra
    Spine-Health Moderator
    ---------------------------------------------------------------
    Please read my Medical History
  • jbowerjbower wisconsin Posts: 31

    Wow, that is a lot going on Michael. I hate reading about people having a fusion done and then it causing issues afterwards. It seems that no one ever has any luck with those. It makes me wonder why they even do them in the first place.

    I commented at some point on someone's blog that after my second lumbar surgery that my surgeon said if this happens again you are looking at a spinal fusion. He mentioned that he does them but doesn't like doing them because it's a non stop treatment. That is puts stress on your other discs and will eventually have to have more done.

    Hi Laura, I like how the new doctor couldn't believe that you were on 9mg of morphine but now has you on 8.5mg of Dilaudid. That's ironic..lol

    My doctor is going to change me over from morphine to Dilaudid next week. She is also going to put in bupivacain which she thinks will help me out a great deal. It's a numbing medication like lidocaine you get from the dentist. It's supposed to numb the nerves along the spinal column. You could ask your doctor if they have any of that to mix in with the pain medication.

    If the Dilaudid doesn't work then she will change it over fentanyl. She mentioned there are other after that but didn't name them. I'm looking forward to trying the bupivacain though as it sounds promising. I go in on the 28th so I can let you know what it feels like afterwards.

    I'm not thrilled about the Dilaudid though as I have had that after two of my surgeries and it did nothing for me to relieve pain. I get more pain relief from my oxycodone 10mg then from the Dilaudid. Maybe the liquid form will be different. It doesn't sound like either one was beneficial for you though.

    They said though the one nice thing about the Flowonix pump is that they can put pretty much anything in them unlike the Medtronic pump. So you shouldn't have to worry about running out of options with what they can put in the pump. I wish they had the 40ml pump though as then the fillups would be farther apart. This brand is fairly new though compared to the Medtronic pump so it shouldn't take too long before they come out with that option.

    I'm glad that you commented on my blog though as it's nice to see someone with the same pump as mine :)

    Taking it one day at a time, that is all we really can do while living with chronic pain.

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  • Jason - it is. I had good relief after my lumbar fusion for about 3 weeks, then everything went back to normal, the doc they performed the surgery does all the surgeries for the Washington Redskins. He was great! At my next appt they are going to test me for pherphial neuropathy. Have they looked into ordering any of your medications in a stronger dose? My doc had explained to me, they can make the dosage of fluid they insert into the pump stronger. Maybe something to inquire about....hope everyone is having a manageable pain day!

  • memerainboltmemerainbolt IndianaPosts: 3,432

    I had my blood work and MRI yesterday. That was interesting. They said my pump would shut off because of the magnets but it would come back on it's own. If it did shut off I could not hear the alarm. But when we finished we walked to my PM's office down the hall. They were waiting for us at the door, diagnostics had called them and wanted it checked. We did too because we had an hour drive home. Everything was fine, it had turned itself back on the minute they were through.

    This goes to my PM doctor who will send it to my Neuro in Indianapolis. Now we wait for that appointment date. Both doctors not only want to look at the catheter but also to see if there is more damage. They are thinking this could one of the reason for the increase in pain.

    Hope everyone had a great Thanksgiving!!

    Sandra
    Spine-Health Moderator
    ---------------------------------------------------------------
    Please read my Medical History
  • jbowerjbower wisconsin Posts: 31

    I'm sorry to hear that Sandra. You really must have a lot of patience when it comes to all of the medical issues. That is definitely something I lack but I blame the military for that. When I was serving everything was a hurry up and wait process that drove me nuts!

    The more time I spend on here reading and commenting on blogs the more amazed I become seeing how so many doctors handle things differently then others. I get that no two people are alike but some protocols you would think would be handled somewhat the same all around.

    I say this based off of your comment about having the MRI and them telling you the pump would shut off on its own. Now that is the same thing they told me as it is a safety shut off in the pump itself. However, both the doctor and the rep said to call them both and let them know when I am having an MRI done. They will be waiting for me wherever the MRI is being done so the rep can remotely shut the pump off. Then the doctor will empty the pump.

    One the MRI is done the doc will fill the pump back up and the rep will turn it back on. Then they will scan it to make sure it is running good. The reason for the extra steps is for safety. Even though the pump will shut itself off and back on the doc likes to remove the medication in case something were to go wrong. They don't want to take a chance of a malfunction and the pump dumps all of the medication at once into my system. Or that it doesn't work correctly once it is back on.

    I personally think that sounds like overkill but it is a good thing knowing that the doc and the rep from Flowonix want to make sure I'm safe when having an MRI.

    Taking it one day at a time, that is all we really can do while living with chronic pain.

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  • memerainboltmemerainbolt IndianaPosts: 3,432

    That does sound like overkill, but you can never be too careful when you are dealing with 40mg of morphine.
    I think we are becoming experts in the field of pain pumps lol. At least we'll all be able to help the next new "pumpster".
    After dealing with all of this for a year, I have learned to be patient. It won't do any good not to.
    Right after I got my pump I ordered a Medical Alert bracelet to wear when I get out. I had my and husband's name and phone number on the front and on the back my PM doctor's name and phone number and Medtronics pain pump 40 mg morphine.
    When I showed it to my PM he said he was going to suggest that to all his pain pump patients, very good idea.

    Hope everyone has a good day!!




    Sandra
    Spine-Health Moderator
    ---------------------------------------------------------------
    Please read my Medical History
  • Hi

    Does a pain pump have to be placed in the spot where the pain is coming from?

    Or just on the spinal chord? The thing is my pain comes from 3/spots, lower middle and top of my spine.

    I have asked my doc about one and want to give it a try, not sure what the criteria is ?

    I live in the UK


    Thank you

  • memerainboltmemerainbolt IndianaPosts: 3,432

    No, the pump can be placed anywhere. There is a line with a catheter at the tip that goes from the pump, around your spine and into a spot around T10. This catheter is then inserted into the interthecal canal, where your fluids are. The meds they put in the pump will stay in the spinal canal, it does not go all over your body or to your brain like oral meds do.
    Once they turn it on, depending upon your daily dose, it will be like a small drip 24/7.
    You have to have patience when first getting a pain pump. It takes a while to slowly find the right dose. You will never be completely out of pain but they will try to find a level you can live with.

    I have a thread called Day One of the Pain Pump Journey. Read parts one and two as it goes from the trial until now. My case is not typical because of the amount of damage in my spine but this will tell you every step of the way.
    But if you have more questions please feel free to ask, one of us will help you.

    Sandra
    Spine-Health Moderator
    ---------------------------------------------------------------
    Please read my Medical History
  • jonisingt35rjjonisingt35r Posts: 165
    edited 11/29/2017 - 5:15 AM

    OK I see so why is this better than taking oral meds then?

    I'm in pain 24 hours a day is this pump for people like me ?

    OK so or works just on the chord itself not in the brain, can't seem to find your thred?

    I'm 48

  • jbowerjbower wisconsin Posts: 31

    Hey Jon, the pump is safer than taking oral meds because with the pump you are only getting a fraction of what you get while taking oral meds. Since the pump can hit the nerves directly which carry the pain signals vs oral that goes through your entire body. Also since it's a constant drip you don't have to worry about the ups and downs of oral meds or worry about when you need to take another dose.

    They also have a device where you can give yourself a bolus dose when needed for those times you are in more pain. You hold it up to where the pump is placed and then push the button. This will then tell the pump to give you an extra dose of medication. The doc sets how much and how often so you can't go overboard. The device will also then tell you how long before you can give yourself another dose.

    The pump is one of the last options available to control your pain. So if it's from something where surgery won't fix it or you run out of options on other treatments then this is the last resort.

    Taking it one day at a time, that is all we really can do while living with chronic pain.

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