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Fentalal pain patch, are they not prescribed after the age of 65?

Hi

Was reading up on these today, and wondered if these patches fentanal patches are stopped when you reach 65? Or can you still get them at any age ?

Thank you

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1

Comments

  • dilaurodilauro ConnecticutPosts: 11,365

    When you have a doctor that will write the prescription for it and the pharmacy has it, there should not be any problem.

    Ron DiLauro Veritas-Health Forums Manager
    I am not a medical professional. I comment on personal experiences
    You can email me at: [email protected]
  • OK I see thank you,

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  • I am almost 69 and still use fentanyl patch

    Emergency surgery in March of 2006 for spinal infection of L 2 and L 3. During surgery, discovered I had Cauda Equina Syndrome. Spine became unstable after surgery and had 360 fusion with 10 pedicle screws, plates and rods in April of 2007.
  • jonisingt35rjjonisingt35r Posts: 165
    edited 12/07/2017 - 4:01 AM

    I'm sure I could possible get a patch I did have one years ago, but to be honest o was too scared.

    One thing o always think about is I know these are 50/100 times more stronger than what I'm currently taking tramadol, is these should in theory work really well for me.

  • sandi123ssandi123 Posts: 474
    edited 12/07/2017 - 10:57 AM

    Jon,

    You really do want to stick with the least potent, effective medication possible, for as long as possible.

    The reason for this, is quite simple. If you jump from tramadol or another "milder " but effective pain medication early on, you leave yourself little to no options later, as you age, and as your condition worsens over decades.

    People, far too often read that one medication or another is 'stronger', 'more potent', and assume that switching to that medication is better, will be a better solution, but the reality is that CHRONIC pain WILL likely worsen over time, and not sticking with what IS effective now, for your current condition, and jumping into more potent meds leaves you WITH no options when those potent meds are no longer effective.

    You have to think long term management.



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  • Sandi123, You are so right. I have been on just about everything at one time or another and stronger isn't always better. I find that if I work a combo of meds correctly, I can keep my tolerance in check and my body adjusts to what I am taking and does well. It has worked for me for the last 25 years although I am aware that at some point I may have to change things up. I go back and forth between MS Contin and Oxycontin to keep tolerance at bay for my long acting med and it keeps my body happy with a pretty miminal dose. I take Percocet for breakthru and always have just a few Dilaudid for when nothing else works. That keeps me out of the ER the majority of the time. Sandi is correct that we have to think of the big picture plus the fact that who knows what the true agenda is regarding opiates. Some organizations want to do away with them completely. I am certainly praying that never happens. Take care,

    Cindy

  • jonisingt35rjjonisingt35r Posts: 165
    edited 12/08/2017 - 4:25 AM

    Hi

    Yes I am petrified of tolerance, I do try to take as less as possible and I really don't want to go up, I'm only 48 sometimes I wish I was 65

    Currently I've not takes more than 300mg of tramadol in a day, I take 2 50mg at a time

  • jonisingt35rjjonisingt35r Posts: 165
    edited 12/08/2017 - 4:27 AM

    Any thoughts about my age I'm 48, do you think I have I am the right side for the meds to help me long term?

    Thank you

  • BitzicatBBitzicat PhoenixPosts: 18

    I am 72 and have been on tramadol for 30 plus years. 400 mg is the max. All the BIG drugs like oxy, Percocet etc. make me sick so I stick with the tramadol. It really ticked me off when it was declared an opioid...ridiculous! I would not consider fentanyl for any reason. I have fibromyalgia and recently had surgery for spondylolisthesis. Still in pain.

    Depending on what is wrong with you (you didn’t say) 48 is still young and if you get addicted to a more powerful drug, what will you do at my age? I have added gabapentin and occasionally 800 mg Motrin to the 400 ER. The extended release version has less of an up and down effect, intended to cover 24 hours.

  • Jon,

    It's not a good idea for us to make suggestions about specific meds for anyone. You are young, new to dealing with chronic pain, and the tramadol appears to be currently working for you. This is a GOOD thing.

    The question about your current meds can be answered this way- does it reduce your pain levels enough that you can perform most of your activities of daily living, with modifications to how you are doing them? If the answer is yes, or mostly, then you also have the answer to your meds at this stage of your treatment.

    As far as future treatment goes, that will be determined by what changes occur in your condition over time, the symptoms, other treatment options available, and what options your doctor feels are the best choices at that time.

    None of us can predict the future, nor know what advances there will be medically, so worrying about what may be down the road is premature. I am not sure you ever mentioned what your current condition is.



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